THE place to start for Microsoft Teams implementation – Adoption Guide (Flipbook)

Microsoft Teams is the hub for teamwork in Office 365. The vision Microsoft has with Teams, of bringing existing products and services together into a central hub and minimising context switching, is a vision I share in and have been fostering for over a decade. Before Teams came along I’d spent over a decade of my career working primarily within Outlook and integrating/surfacing other applications and services within Outlook to provide that hub. Outlook was (and still is in most organisations) the first application opened in the morning and the last to be closed at the end of the day. To me it has been blindingly obvious that we can help make users more efficient and productive by bringing the data and information they work with into core applications that they live inside of already, and prevent them having a plethora of applications open on the desktop and constantly switching between them. Outlook was that hub application for me.

Enter Microsoft Teams, a client built from the ground up to bring existing services, applications and product features into a central hub in the context of teams of people working together on a common goal or purpose. Finally Microsoft was no longer thinking in individual products isolated from each other and starting to realise the benefit of combining the power of all of those products for a focused purpose. In essence that is what we have all been doing for many many years, we select a mix of products that allow us to get our job done and where possible we try to integrate them because products that are integrated just make our lives easier! 

It’s easy to see why Microsoft Teams has been getting some seriously good traction since it’s introduction and is set to overtake Slack.

I’m sure this uptick in usage was also helped by the fact that Microsoft Teams in now a free offering.

As with any product, it won’t magically fix your business problems simply by being installed and present on users machines. To make any product successful you will need a plan and to execute on it. To this end Microsoft has released an excellent resource in the Microsoft Teams Adoption Guide. This flipbook packs a lot of valuable information into a very polished and concise package. I highly recommend it as your starting point to a successful implementation of Microsoft Teams.

What I particularly like about Microsoft Teams is that it already has a rich extensibility story with developers being able to bring existing line of business application into the Teams client and allowing Teams to be the hub not only of Microsoft products and services but also non-Microsoft products and your own custom applications.

About Cameron Dwyer

Chief Technology Officer at OnePlace Solutions. Microsoft MVP: Office Dev Passionate about delivering compelling solutions on the Office 365/SharePoint platform. Addicted to coffee.

Posted on December 14, 2018, in Office, Office 365, Outlook, Teams, Uncategorized and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 1 Comment.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: